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Conference Review

The conference was held at Senate House, London from the 17th to the 19th of July 2003 and attended by 170 delegates from the UK and overseas. It was organised by the English Subject Centre, the Institute of English Studies and the Council for College and University English.

  • Purpose
  • Themes
  • Reflective review

The Purpose of the Conference...

... was to ask questions that are commonly excluded by the schedules, structures, and bureaucracies in which we work, and questions which focus on the materialisation of English in taught programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

The aim was to consider how English is both theorised and produced in material, institutionalised and pedagogical practices at the beginning of the 21st century. The discipline of English has evolved rapidly over the last two decades in response to its intellectual self-interrogations, and alongside these transformations wrought by institutional imperatives, national agendas, and the new professionalism have had a large impact. In addition, the international status of English is changing, and the nature of the subject's relations to other disciplines has had profound effects on the understanding of its intellectual boundaries. English, the predominant language of the internet, is also the instrument of new literacies and technologies, whose potential is to transform the object of study itself.

Conference themes

The conference was organised through themes, and the prime theme will be the curriculum.

A list of themes is provided below. The graphics correspond to the thematic sessions in the conference schedule itself. Select a theme to read a short description of that theme.

Condition & Culture Condition & Culture Information Technology Information Technology
Creative Writing Creative Writing Post Colonialism/ English in International Contexts Post Colonialism/ English in International Contexts
Curriculum Curriculum Teaching, Learning & Assessment
Historicism Historicism Theory Theory

Reflective Review by Professor Ben Knights

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