Newsletter: Issue 1

Teaching library

May 2001

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Contents

Welcome
  • The Establishing of the English Subject Centre
    Professor Judy Simons, Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, De Montfort University, is Chair of the English Subject Centre Management Committee. In her former office as Chair of CCUE, Judy played a prime role in the establishment of the Centre. Here she writes of her expectations of its success.
  • The Role and Purpose of the English Subject Centre
    Professor Philip Martin, Director, English Subject Centre, Royal Holloway, University of London. As the Director of the Centre, Philip Martin writes of the importance of its integration with the subject community.
Profession
  • Professionalism and English Studies
    Dr Vivien Jones, Senior Lecturer, School of English, University of Leeds, writes of her experience in the role of Director of Learning and Teaching in the School of English, and of the tensions to be negotiated.
  • Research-led Teaching or Teaching-led Research?
    The discussion about the relations between teaching and research is one which is likely to become amplified as the RAE and Academic Review are appearing on the immediate horizon. Here, Professor Ann Thompson, Department of English, King’s College London considers the relation between the two.
  • Does Researching Help or Hinder Your Teaching?
    Professor R. J. Ellis, Department of English and Media Studies, Nottingham Trent University, ponders the effects of the Research Assessment Exercise, and discusses the relation between a thriving research culture and good teaching.
  • English on the Boundaries
    Professor Ben Knights, Section Head of English, University of Teesside, considers English Studies and its engagement with vocationalism.
  • Academic Review for English, 2002: The Subject Overview Report for English
    Professor Philip Martin, Director, English Subject Centre, here offers a digest of the Summary Report of the last teaching assessment exercise in English, 1994-95.
  • Pay Attention Now!
    Dr Michael Luntley, Department of Philosophy, University of Warwick, discusses the models of knowledge implicit in systems used to evaluate teaching practice.
Practice
  • Creative Writing
    Andrew Motion, Poet Laureate and Professor of Creative Writing, School of English and American Studies, University of East Anglia, reflects on the growth and establishment of programmes in creative writing, and the opportunity to address some fundamental questions from a position of strength.
  • Creative Writing Workshops
    Julia Bell, School of English and American Studies, University of East Anglia, discusses the value of the workshop in teaching creative writing.
  • Enriching Academic Method
    Alistair Dunning, Information, Training & Research, Arts and Humanities Data Service, discusses the relationship between electronic resources and traditional teaching methods in English Studies.
  • Humanities Computing
    Dr John Lavagnino, Lecturer, Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London, describes the mutually informing disciplines of humanities and applied computing.
  • The Death of the Essay
    Professor David Punter, Department of English, University of Bristol, argues for the realisation that radical changes in the structures of information and authority make the essay, and its conventional place in assessment, anachronistic.
  • Teaching Travel Literature
    Dr Robin Jarvis, Reader in English, University of the West of England, recounts his experiences in the establishment of modules in travel writing at undergraduate and postgraduate level.
  • Curriculum 2000: What do you teach, my lord?
    Keverne Smith, College of West Anglia, King’s Lynn, introduces the ‘Curriculum 2000’ qualifications that are replacing ‘A’ Levels.
  • Speak-Write
    Dr Rebecca Stott, Head of the Department of English and Reader in Victorian Literature at Anglia Polytechnic University, and Dr Tory Young, Editorial Manager of the Speak-Write books at Anglia Polytechnic University, discuss the Speak-Write project, which they co-direct.
English Subject Centre News and Events
  • Subject Centre’s ‘Seminar Day’. Dr Siobhn Holland, Project Officer for Academic Liaison, English Subject Centre, reports on the first study-day held at the Centre in December.
  • Behind the Acronyms. Learn more about BUFVC, HAN, NAWE and NTFS.